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The Royal Naval Division Memorial is dedicated to the 45,000 members of the Royal Naval Division who died during World War I. The memorial is located in the northwest corner of Horse Guards Parade next to Old Admiralty Buildings.

The Royal Naval Division was formed in 1914 by Winston Churchill as an intervention force, fighting in World War I at Gallipoli and on the Western Front before being disbanded in 1919.

The memorial was commissioned by surviving Royal Naval Division members and takes the form of a stone obelisk and fountain. It includes an inscription by Rupert Brooke, who died on active service with the Royal Naval Division in the Dardanelles in 1915. It reads the sonnet:

BLOW OUT YOU BUGLES, OVER THE RICH DEAD / THERE'S NONE OF THESE SO LONELY AND POOR OF OLD / BUT, DYING HAS MADE US RARER GIFTS THAN GOLD / THESE LAID THE WORLD AWAY: POURED OUT THE RED / SWEET WINE OF YOUTH; GAVE UP THE YEARS TO BE. / OF WORK AND JOY, AND THAT UNHOPED SERENE / THAT MEN CALL AGE: AND THOSE WHO WOULD HAVE BEEN / THEIR SONS, THEY GAVE THEIR IMMORTALITY

It was designed by Sir Edmin Lutyens and unveiled at Horse Guards in 1925 by Winston Churchill, alongside Sir Ian Hamilton – the commander of the Gallipoli campaign.

The memorial was removed in 1939 when the Admiralty Citadel was built between Horse Guards Parade and The Mall and later installed at the Royal Naval College at Greenwich in 1951.

It returned to Horse Guards and was re-dedicated in 2003 on Beaucourt Day (the Regimental Day on November 13 marking the successful attack on Beaucourt-sur-L'Ancre in the Battle of the Somme in 1916).

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